Contact Us


Mailing Address:

401 Red Barn Dr.
Belgrade MT 59714

Email:

lucyslight@yahoo.com

Phone:

406.539.3449

Our Kids

Adeline

The war on cancer for Adeline began on September 2nd, 2015. Initially Adeline was diagnosed with acute pneumonia…

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Adeline

The war on cancer for Adeline began on September 2nd, 2015. Initially Adeline was diagnosed with acute pneumonia and life flighted from Bozeman Deaconess to St. Vincent's in Billings. Every parent’s nightmare occurred shortly after arriving in Billings where a CT scan revealed a softball sized tumor in her chest. Her parent’s world came crashing down around their ears as they learned that the tumor had completely disabled their daughter’s left lung and was putting pressure on her heart and major arteries. Adeline was immediately flown from Billings to Children’s Hospital in Aurora, Colorado, where she currently is turning the tide against this terrible disease.

Adeline was diagnosed with Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor which originated from the thymus gland in her chest. MRT is one of the rarest childhood cancers known today. Only about 20 children a year are diagnosed worldwide. Adeline’s first battle was to escape the confines of the PICU where she and her parents lived for 3 weeks making sure that she was able to breath and that her heart could function while the doctors on her team strategized over the best possible course of action. That course of action requires some of the most powerful and side-effect ridden chemotherapies available in the arsenal of the Oncologists at Children’s Hospital. These chemotherapies all but turn the spot of sunshine that Adeline is into a shadow of herself. But the therapies have been working thus far. After the first cycle her vitals stabilized and her breathing improved and she was allowed to travel up four floors to the Oncology floor. The first three treatments shrunk the tumor by over 78% and a partial resection was completed on November 23rd to remove the bulk of the remaining tumor. During her workup for a bone marrow transplant in January it was discovered that the tumor had grown during a two week lapse between chemo treatments. It went from being a thin postage stamp clinging to an artery near the lung to the size of a golf ball piercing her left lung in the matter of 7 days. The bone marrow transplant procedure was cancelled and Adeline began emergency chemotherapies on January 13th, her 3rd birthday, to get back in front of the aggressive cancer.  She has had radiation treatment and stem cell transplant to rid her body of cancer. Addie has spent many months in the intensive care unit secondary to multiple complications from her toxic treatments.

Adeline is a sweet and intelligent little girl who has an extreme fondness for her brother, Deklan, and Star Wars. Her Dad is very proud of the fact that she can tell anyone what color of lightsaber a Jedi has in any of the Star Wars movies and can name characters just by their lines. She loves to play chemist with her Mom by mixing different colors of paint together to see what new colors they can invent. And she has a smile that could melt the polar ice caps. Prior to this war, Adeline was an avid swimmer who liked to show off how long she could hold her breath under water. Even though Christmas comes with all kinds of surprises, her favorite holiday is Easter because dyeing Easter eggs and finding them are her all-time favorite things to do. She is a wonderful and spirited little girl. But perhaps her most important traits are her steely resolve and unbreakable strength. She has shown the utmost courage in the face of unbelievable terror and she is ferociously strong willed. She continually proves her doctors and nurses wrong on a daily basis as she out fights her tumor. You can follow her epic journey through her father’s ramblings at http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/addigengenbacher.

Aiden

Aidan is Californian boy who loves playing soccer, wrestling, snowboarding, swimming, riding his motorcycle and playing video games.…

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Aiden

Aidan is Californian boy who loves playing soccer, wrestling, snowboarding, swimming, riding his motorcycle and playing video games. Aidan is a positive thinker, an inventor, an avid reader and a great student. Aidan especially like spending time with his family, his friends and his Labrador puppy. What sets Aidan apart from other boys his age is the fact that he has battled and survived Stage 4, Neuroblastoma Cancer. According to Aidan his life changed after his diagnosis at 6 years old, because he had to take lots of medicine, which took him across the country to Sloan Kettering in New York City.

Aidan’s treatment included 7 rounds of chemotherapy, a 9 1/2 hour surgery to remove the tumor and cancerous lymph nodes. Aidan also received 14 rounds of radiation, 6 rounds of oral Accutane, 10 rounds of 3f8 antibodies and now is on a 2 year trial oral medication called DFMO as a investigational relapse cancer prevention.

Today Aidan is in 8th grade and doing great.  Our family is so thankful for the support and love that surrounds him. We are blessed that there are a handful of amazing doctors dedicating their work to Neuroblastoma. Please pray for Aidan's continued remission and a long full life! Please pray that the medical world will solve Cancer!!! 

Allistaire

Angel Allistaire Kieron Anderson lived six tumultuous, bright, brutal, giddy years. She was born on March 6, 2010,…

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Allistaire

Angel

Allistaire Kieron Anderson lived six tumultuous, bright, brutal, giddy years. She was born on March 6, 2010, and was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia when she was only 21-months old; her battle required over 500 inpatient days at Seattle Children's Hospital and nearly 3 years of separation from home and family. She endured a great deal including two bone marrow transplants. Yet, Allistaire's life was also one of joy and abundance. She was a girl who loved to dance, laugh, color, play all sorts of imaginative games and who drew people to herself with her delight, her strength and tenacity. Her life helped push forward cancer research and clinical care. Allistaire passed away as a result of cancer on April 30, 2016. 

Our bright, feisty, tenderhearted, little girl battled her foe for over two-thirds of her life. From the very beginning, back in December 2011, it was evident that Allistaire was the beneficiary of cancer research. Just to get an accurate diagnosis and then to have a clue how to fight were instant gifts built on a foundation of cancer research that spans back decades. Knowing we started out the gate indebted to those who went before us, we gladly signed Allistaire up to participate in clinical research, rejoicing in the knowledge that come what may, this was one small way we could express our thanks and give to those who would come after her.

Allistaire first relapsed in February 2013.  She would most certainly have died had it not been for the grace of God and an incredible gift of a clinical trial through Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center for a transplant that did not require remission. In June of that year, she had her first bone marrow transplant with over 70% disease in her marrow and 9 tumors scattered throughout her body. Yet again, we found ourselves indebted to the opportunities afforded her through cancer research.

AML reared its head again in October 2014. A second bone marrow transplant was her only chance for survival. We feared, that like the previous time, Allistaire would not be able to get into remission, yet a new combination of chemos, thanks to the advances of cancer research, smacked that cancer down and, with her disease in remission, she was scheduled to get her second bone marrow transplant in March 2015.

This time it was the ravages of treatment that took her down. In January 2015 she nearly died from a severe gut infection resulting from her extremely immune suppressed state because of chemo. While she survived the infection, she went into heart failure to the point that we were told she would never recover her cardiac function.  By November of 2015, however, Allistaire's heart was amazingly enough on the mend that we were once again able to consider a second transplant  She received her second bone marrow transplant on January 12, 2016 with initial tests detecting no cancer.  Unfortunately in April the cancer returned with a vengeance and we returned home to Montana with Hospice as Allistaire’s wish was to be back home.

We live in a time where cancer research is on the move and truly exciting doors are opening up.  We need treatment that doesn't come at the severe cost to the rest of the body - treatment that will at long last cure!

Ashlee

Ashlee is 5 years NED!  In February 18, 2010, however, we received the news that brings every parent…

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Ashlee

Ashlee is 5 years NED!  In February 18, 2010, however, we received the news that brings every parent to their knees, she had cancer. Ashlee had Osteosarcoma in her right rotor cuff and 90% of her humorous bone. She started chemo the next week. Six months into treatment, the cancer metastasized to her lungs, so her road map was changed, basically started over. After 13 months of chemo and three surgeries to remove the tumors, she was NEC. She is in 5th grade now and after four additional surgeries, is now able to participate in PE and maybe sports starting this year. She is our little miracle. Please support research to find better methods to treat childhood cancer.  The after effects are hard to deal with for the child and no one knows what they can turn out to be, it maybe another cancer from the medicine treating the current cancer. Most children have very high anxiety, cognitive issues and a lot of physical and emotional stresses. Please let us make it better for all the children out there.

Ashylnn

Angel Ashlynn was always a happy, healthy, energetic, busy little girl. Big hazel eyes, beautiful blond hair and…

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Ashylnn

Angel

Ashlynn was always a happy, healthy, energetic, busy little girl. Big hazel eyes, beautiful blond hair and a big happy smile all the time. She is the youngest of 2 brothers and 2 sisters. Ashlynn was a very special girl who taught so much too so many in her short time here with us. Those who knew her were blessed. She loved crafts, dancing, singing, and playing the piano, harmonica and her guitar. Rosie was full of life, she was brave and strong, enjoyed life to its fullest playing with her brothers and sisters or alone for hours. She always had a bright smile.

She started having stomach pain on August 1, 2009. I brought her to the doctors for 3 days and was told she was constipated every time. Finally on Aug.4 they did a CAT scan and told me my little girl had cancer. It was 18 days after her 6th Birthday. How could this be happening! We were transferred to UVA hospital where she had her first surgery and we were told she had DSRCT, a very rare cancer. Oncologists there told us we should bring her to NY to Sloan Kettering or keep her there and keep her comfortable. Beautiful Ashlynn “Rosie” Hauser, age 8, of Mountain View Road, Appomattox, VA, earned her “Golden Angel Wings” Tuesday, December 27, 2011 at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York with her Mom and Dad and family by her side.

Austin

Austin was diagnosed 8-11-10 with acute lymphocytic Leukemia-Philadelphia positive he had just turned 13. He was treated for…

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Austin

Austin was diagnosed 8-11-10 with acute lymphocytic Leukemia-Philadelphia positive he had just turned 13. He was treated for 3 years with chemotherapy and a lot of hospital stays in Helena, MT. He began his first remission May 11, 2013 and had already done drivers education. So he was 16 years old and was able to enjoy a summer like a normal teenager. November 18, 2013 he had a bloody nose that did not stop so we took him to the ER. Due to his history of Leukemia we asked for blood draw we thought he may have been low on platelets. Within 15 minutes ER doctor had already contacted his oncology doctor and came and told us he had relapsed. He was admitted and he was extremely low on platelets, and blood. And they began an aggressive chemotherapy treatment. We spent 31 days in the hospital were home just in time for Christmas. We traveled to Seattle over New Year’s Weekend for his ordination for bone marrow transplant and he was blessed with multiple matches.  On January 18, 2014 we headed to Seattle for a 5 month stay.  He got chemotherapy and radiation (full body and head) and then he was admitted to Seattle Children's Hospital where he received his bone marrow transplant at 1:20 am February 21, 2014. We remained in children's in a total of 6 weeks stay. He remained as outpatient until we headed home June 2, 2014. When we returned home he was checked every week, then every other, and now he is checked once a month for blood work.  He graduated high school in June of 2015 and remains in remission.

Brooke

Angel For years, from the moment of Brooke's actual diagnosis in mid-November 2010, our "normal" lives forever changed.…

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Brooke

Angel

For years, from the moment of Brooke's actual diagnosis in mid-November 2010, our "normal" lives forever changed. We found ourselves as parents suddenly on a fast rolling, full speed ahead, fully loaded freight train doing anything and everything we possibly could to help save the life of our child here on Earth. There were times we were with her as she climbed insurmountable mountainous obstacles only to reach a new, steeper, more treacherous mountain on the other side. We have been going and going and going with her nonstop so fast that everything else that was normal in everyone else's lives often became a blur as we gave every ounce of mental and physical energy we had to focus on helping Brooke. As we began to realize all of the other children who were also fighting, suffering and dying, we relentlessly sought to find ways to help other kids with cancer at the same time we were giving every ounce of everything we had all the time to saving the life of our own child while at the same time, laying her at the feet of God and asking for His will over our own for this remarkable gift of a little girl that we were blessed to be able to call our daughter. We saw many miracles over these years, the ultimately, mercifully, we endured watching her leave her defeated body and go to be with God.

This is the most painful thing I have ever, ever endured as a mother and human being I am thankful it was not painful for Brooke.  

Brookes’s Blossoms & Buddies “Planting Seeds of Faith, Love and Hope for Cures….One Smile at a Time!” 

www.brookefightsback.org

http://www.brookesblossoms.org/

Caden

Caden is a sweet, active second grader from Bozeman. While on vacation in March 2012, Caden began to…

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Caden

Caden is a sweet, active second grader from Bozeman. While on vacation in March 2012, Caden began to complain of leg pain. Two weeks later, the pain was more severe and he developed a fever that would not go away. After three days of tests in Bozeman, he was flown to Seattle Children’s Hospital and diagnosed with stage IV, high risk neuroblastoma. His bone marrow was completely full of cancer, at the tender age of 3. Caden’s treatment has included chemotherapy, surgery, experimental targeted radiation therapy, bone marrow transplant, external beam radiation, immunotherapy, and differentiation therapy. Following two relapses in 2013 and 2014, Caden just completed a two-year trial designed to keep him in remission.  He currently has no evidence of disease!

http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/cadenshrauger

on Facebook - The Bozeman 3 ​

Charley

Charley was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on October 21, 2014. In the weeks leading up to her…

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Charley

Charley was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on October 21, 2014. In the weeks leading up to her diagnosis she was experiencing flu like symptoms that led to her limping on her right leg and a pale like complexion. It wasn’t a few hours after a checkup and blood draw that we were told news that would forever change our lives. It appeared that Charley had leukemia and we were flown to Denver Children's Hospital that night. Charley began chemotherapy within the next few days and we remained in Denver for 30 days until she achieved remission. Charley completed treatment in December 2016. 

Charley is a big spirited, brown eyed, brave little girl. She loves the outdoors, animals and most of all her little brother and sister. Charley has endured pain that no child should ever have to go through. And as she continues to fight her battle she keeps her head held high, her bright spirit, and a contagious laugh.  

Clayton

Angel Clayton was 5yrs old when I started seeing some small changes in him.....we thought maybe he was…

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Clayton

Angel

Clayton was 5yrs old when I started seeing some small changes in him.....we thought maybe he was just having a touch of the flu...but it was too often. Then there were the headaches in the middle of the night, then the tripping and falling, the gait in his walk, then the lazy eye. In June of 2009...the doctors found a tumor the size of a thumb that had attached to Clayton's brain stem. Within a day he was in Salt Lake having a 7 hour surgery to remove it. He spent the next year fighting what doctors diagnosed as stage 4 Medullablastoma Cancer. My 5yr old healthy little boy when from running and playing to going through 6 weeks of radiation, then 6 months of chemotherapy. We watched him endure more than any child or adult should have to ever experience. But through it all he was so tough! He fought hard, and we did everything medically necessary to keep him here as long as we could. But in the end...he lost his battle on July 29th, 2010. For every parent out there who has children, be aware of the small changes in them. Don't ever question taking them in and getting them checked out if something doesn't appear right. We are so thankful for the 6 years we had with Clayton. He was an amazing little boy. Not a day goes by that we don't think of him. 

Cole

Angel (12/15/2003 - 07/29/2015) Cole Matthew Winnefeld, age 11, of Bedford, finally received his ultimate healing on July…

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Cole

Angel

(12/15/2003 - 07/29/2015) Cole Matthew Winnefeld, age 11, of Bedford, finally received his ultimate healing on July 29, 2015 at his home in Bedford, Indiana. Cole was born in Bloomington, Indiana on December 15th, 2003 to Michael and Carol (Pritchett) Winnefeld. Cole was a member of Sherwood Oaks Christian Church in Bloomington, Indiana. He recently graduated from Needmore Elementary School in Bedford, Indiana, and had also attended St. Mark’s Nursery School in Bloomington, Indiana. Cole was a proud member of the Marian University Football team. Cole was diagnosed in 2009 with stage 4 Neuroblastoma, and fought through multiple rounds of treatment and therapies for over six years. He never achieved remission. Cole was the most amazing son, brother, grandson, nephew, cousin, teammate and friend to so many! He was a chef, Lego master, food connoisseur, comedian, artist, warrior, Jedi, Disney enthusiast, Oswald obsessed, animal loving, family oriented, devoted, giving, selfless superhero who was devoted to his faith and his Savior, Jesus Christ. Additionally, one of his wishes was to provide fun Band-Aids to the kids at his doctor’s office; boxes to collect kid’s bandages will also be provided at the church.

http://batcole.foundation/

Dakota

Dakota was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer called Neuroblastoma when she was 4 months old. She relapsed twice…

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Dakota

Dakota was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer called Neuroblastoma when she was 4 months old. She relapsed twice and endured many surgeries, clinical trials, radiation, and chemotherapy to try and rid her of her cancer. In April 2014 she was taken off of her latest clinical trial, a novel therapy called Perifosine, and so far her refractory bony disease has not progressed. 6 of her 9 years of life have been spent in treatment fighting cancer. She is now a happy, thriving 4th grader and is loving life! 

Delaney

Our story began when we started noticing that Delaney had a slight limp.  Little did we know that…

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Delaney

Our story began when we started noticing that Delaney had a slight limp.  Little did we know that this was the beginning of our worst nightmare.

During the next several weeks we took Delaney to our pediatrician, to an orthopedic doctor, to a pediatric orthopedic doctor, and finally we arrived at Morristown Memorial Hospital where pediatric oncologists began testing her.  The blood test was not normal and the MRI showed activity in her bone marrow. The doctors suspected leukemia. We were in shock. Dr. Miller (our pediatric oncologist) came in to talk to us. She said that Delaney had all the symptoms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). At that point my world crumbled. All I heard was "two and a half years of intense treatment," while Bobby heard "Delaney will graduate from high school, get married, and have a family of her own".

The doctors then took a bone marrow sample and performed a spinal tap. After waiting hours for the results, the doctor informed us that there was no sign of leukemia. We couldn't believe it; we had prepared for the worst.  Delaney was released from the hospital and we went home. Four days later, on Saturday, Delaney and Mommy both got a virus, and by Tuesday Delaney was again refusing to walk. The doctors told us to return to the hospital for more testing. They redid the bone marrow test, this time taking a sample from both hips as well as a bone chip. We waited anxiously all day for the results. Although the test results were inconclusive, the doctors were pretty sure she had leukemia or neuroblastoma (a rare childhood cancer). The next day they did a CT scan of her body, looking for tumors.  Dr. Mahmoud came in and confirmed our worst nightmare: our little girl had a tumor on her kidney and was diagnosed with Neuroblastoma stage 4.

February of 2009 is when we started the fight for Delaney's life.  In June, exactly 4 months after she was diagnosed, she was declared NED.   She went on to do radiation, low-dose chemo, and 3F8.  In March of 2010 Delaney experienced a small relapse on her skull. From March until September of 2010 Delaney received chemo. In October 2011 we started the Phase I Neuroblastoma Vaccine.  She is currently NED and we continue to have faith that she will be CURED forever.

Dustin

Around the beginning of February this year, Dustin was having pain in his bum.  We waited it out…

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Dustin

Around the beginning of February this year, Dustin was having pain in his bum.  We waited it out a bit but after consistent pain I took him to the ER where they did an ultrasound and found a lump but said it was a hematoma, to apply heat to the area and take aspirin.  On February 13, Dustin and I went to a birthday party for a friend’s son and he playfully fell down when he missed a shot and I noticed him limping around. When we went home he was complaining of pain in the same area and the next morning I took him to the ER again. The ER doctor this time ordered a MRI and said there was an “undetermined mass” and contacted our doctor's office to make arrangements for us to go to Salt Lake City for further testing. On March 8 Dustin was officially diagnosed with Ewing Sarcoma, the oncology team set up a treatment plan that includes 14 chemotherapy treatments which started on March 15. Dustin is currently is currently NED! He is a student at Belgrade Middle School.

Eli

Angel ​Eli (elihorn.com) was diagnosed with Stage IV Neuroblastoma at the age of three and a half. After…

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Eli

Angel

​Eli (elihorn.com) was diagnosed with Stage IV Neuroblastoma at the age of three and a half. After many rounds of surgeries, radiation, chemotherapy, and antibody treatments, Eli was determined to have no more evidence of disease, but unfortunately those treatments ended up causing a secondary cancer, acute myeloid leukemia. Eli passed away in January of 2012 just before his 8th birthday after a bone marrow transplant was performed to try to rid him of AML. Sadly, secondary cancer is a risk that most radiation/chemotherapy patients face.

Emma

Emma was diagnosed with a rare form of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma on October 27, 2014 at the age of…

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Emma

Emma was diagnosed with a rare form of Hodgkin’s Lymphoma on October 27, 2014 at the age of 6. She had one enlarged tonsil and a lymph node that had failed to return to normal size for over five months. A week after being diagnosed, Emma went to Seattle Children’s Hospital to begin three 21-day cycles of chemotherapy. She had a hard time being away from her friends and family, including her big brother and sister. Her biggest heartbreak was losing her hair. Her beautiful red hair fell out on Thanksgiving Day. For the most part, Emma handled the whole situation with a smile on her face and a fantastic attitude. While in Seattle, she was able to attend hospital school. She also had a good time visiting the zoo, the aquarium, and the Space Needle. Emma made several friends while she and her mom were living in the Ronald McDonald House. Emma will continue to make trips to Seattle for scans and follow ups, but her family is so thankful for her excellent prognosis.   Emma’s 2 year post treatment scans show no evidence of disease!

https://www.facebook.com/groups/emmasjourneymt/ 

Gabrielle

On May 18, 2012, our lives changed forever. We were told our sweet girl, Gabrielle LeDuc, was diagnosed…

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Gabrielle

On May 18, 2012, our lives changed forever. We were told our sweet girl, Gabrielle LeDuc, was diagnosed with ALL Leukemia. Gabby and I were immediately life flighted from Kalispell, MT to Spokane, Washington. Gabby and I stayed at the Ronald McDonald house for 9 months while receiving Chemo treatments at Sacred Heart Children's Hospital. Many people had a hand in Gabby's journey. Gabby's last Chemo was on July 23, 2014. She is doing well and we are so thankful every single day. We are still fighting the good fight for our friends that are still receiving treatments. Won't you fight with us? 

Jack

3x Neuroblastoma survivor. Dx: January 2, 2004 Relapse: January 4, 2009  Relapse: August 26, 2010 Currently NED!!! JACKO!!!!....…

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Jack

3x Neuroblastoma survivor.

Dx: January 2, 2004

Relapse: January 4, 2009  Relapse: August 26, 2010

Currently NED!!!

JACKO!!!!.... He is doing awesome!!! His eye rolls are in tow but other than that he had a great summer just hanging out, working at a summer camp during the day for a few weeks and back on the court by afternoon!!! He loves being spread out with scans every 6 months now which brings me to our next topic!!! Jack remains NED, thank goodness! We do not have as many days of scans as much anymore but we do have our standard MIBG , bloodwork, urine collection and a few MRI's.  We stay overnight there and head back home with what we always hope is good news!!! He is in HIGHSCHOOL and loves basketball! I can't quite express here in words how overwhelmed with pride I am for him. He has been to hell and back and continues to be his own awesome, laid back self. When he was first dx in 2004 with this disgusting disease we were told he most likely wouldn't see kindergarten at YALE. I looked at Jeff, although petrified and said..."This kid is gonna see HS and beyond."....When he relapsed after almost 5 years clean in second grade, we were absolutely shaken and I said the same exact thing. Then when he relapsed the day before 4th grade, I never wavered and said it again, this time beyond ultimately petrified. He did it...high school!! Now we go with BEYOND!!!! 

Jak

Jak lives in Butte, MT and has an older brother, Bo, and older sister, Kira.  During Jak’s 3…

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Jak

Jak lives in Butte, MT and has an older brother, Bo, and older sister, Kira.  During Jak’s 3 year well-child checkup, Jak’s pediatrician found a lump in Jak’s belly. This lump turned out to be a large neuroblastoma tumor. Jak had absolutely no symptoms so this diagnosis was a big shock. Jak had 8 rounds of chemotherapy and big surgery to remove the tumor. He is currently NED. After Jak’s tumor resection surgery it was discovered that he had multiple arachnoid cysts compressing his spinal cord. He has had 8 spine surgeries, with laminectomies at T4-7. Jak has developed scoliosis and kyphosis as a result of the cysts and surgeries. But he is doing well, is still NED and loves to play PlayStation, Legos, and go camping.

www.caringbridge.org/visit/jakmortensen 

James

James is a charming, playful little boy. He has the most amazing dimpled smile that lights up the…

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James

James is a charming, playful little boy. He has the most amazing dimpled smile that lights up the world. He loves life and played his way through treatment. He was only two years old when he was diagnosed with a hard-to-treat subtype of cancer. When James was diagnosed there hadn’t been any kids who lived more than 36 months and his prognosis not good.  James fought cancer bravely and never let the poor prognosis keep him down. There were many days when he was playing in the hospital hallways while getting chemo dispensed from an IV. 

Just like many little boys, he loves speed. He loves to ride rollercoasters and anything else that moves fast.  Once during a turbulent flight he held his hands in the air and yelled “Wheee, do it again!” during the roughest part. The other passengers didn’t share his joy as the plane was tossed around in the air. He likes playing with Hot Wheels cars and tracks. He likes Thomas the Train and Toystory. He likes playing in his sandbox and going down slides. He loves playing Mario Kart on wii and playing Angry Birds Star Wars. He enjoys making messes and eating chocolate ice cream cones. His favorite possession in the whole world is his "special blankie.". He doesn't go anywhere without it and it gives him comfort through all of life's boo boos.

The things he hates most are needles. He needs to get blood drawn every 6 months to make sure he is still in remission and he hates it. He begs me and the nurses not to stick him with the needle and as his mom it breaks my heart that he is so afraid. He is very brave and never struggles or fights even though he hates it. He just cries a bit when it hurts. Even though he was 2, he remembers things about his cancer treatment. He hates IV poles. The IV pole was too big for him to push by himself and made it impossible for him to run and play. When he sees an IV pole he begins to cry. He gets so sad and says that he doesn't want it. As his mom I know that it is more than just him knowing he can't play. I believe he knows how bad the chemo made him feel. We always called his chemo "Get better forever medicine", in hopes he would understand why he needed it. He is a brave boy and makes me very proud as his mom.


Thank you so much for supporting Cookies for Kids Cancer. The contributions will be used to make a difference for kids like James. His survival was not considered likely and there was no proven effective treatment for his cancer. That should not be a reality facing any child, ever. Childhood cancer research is seriously underfunded. Even though 600 kids each day are diagnosed and 200 others lose their battle each day, it is considered rare. Better treatments, more research funding and larger clinical trials are desperately needed to stop childhood cancer. Thank you for making a difference. Thank you for helping fund cures for kids!

Jensen

Angel Jensen was diagnosed in Dec of 2007 with Stage 4 Neuroblastoma. He completed a grueling 14 month…

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Jensen

Angel

Jensen was diagnosed in Dec of 2007 with Stage 4 Neuroblastoma. He completed a grueling 14 month treatment plan only to relapse 3 months later in May of 2009. He had the tumor removed, was cleared of disease and was undergoing preventative 3F8 treatment in New York. He relapsed again with a brain tumor on 12/30/09, cleared and relapsed a 3rd time in the chest, lung, and liver on 8/8/10. Jman earned his angel wings on 8/24/10.

One of my last and greatest memories of Jensen occurred while he was home on hospice. He became so excited and engrossed in his new Super Slugger Baseball game that he wanted to go outside and play himself. We rounded up balls, gloves, and the only bat we had was a toy wooden Louisville Slugger, but he didn’t care. He used what should have been his kindergarten backpack to hold his morphine pump and out we went. He gave each of us a character name and he played his little heart out. When the pain became too much, he sat and coached from the sidelines. It was that last display of courage and drive that inspired us to start an annual Super Slugger Softball tournament which has raised over $20,000 to date. He never gave up and he lived his life whole heartedly. He taught us all so much in 5 short years and I can only hope that I will continue to learn from him and make him proud.

Jensen's Heart of Gold Foundation

Julie

In 2008 Julie was diagnosed with retinoblastoma in the left eye. She received 4 intra-arterial chemotherapy treatments. Her…

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Julie

In 2008 Julie was diagnosed with retinoblastoma in the left eye. She received 4 intra-arterial chemotherapy treatments. Her scans were clean 3/3/09 thru 1/30/2013, when she relapsed. On 2/4/2013 she had her left eye enucleated. She got her "new eye" (prosthesis) on 3/13/2013. She continues to have clean scans in her right eye and is CANCER FREE! Julie loves cheerleading, dancing and pageants, she is very active in promoting Child Cancer Awareness. 

http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/julielaytonbryan

Kyler

Kyler was 17 months old when he was diagnosed with Leukemia on March 8, 2011. He was flown…

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Kyler

Kyler was 17 months old when he was diagnosed with Leukemia on March 8, 2011. He was flown over to Seattle, WA immediately to start chemotherapy and to find out his treatment plan would be 3 1/2 years long. We lived in Seattle for 11 months and were finally able to go home when he started his maintenance phase in Feb 2012. While he was in his maintenance phase of treatment we were informed his cancer was back on Feb 13, 2013. He then had to return to Seattle for a more aggressive chemotherapy and cranial radiation. His new treatment plan is now two years long but he will have more chemo during his maintenance phase and has to visit Seattle every 8 weeks. We got home November 2013 just in time for Thanksgiving.

Kyler relapsed June 2014 (Second relapse) and it was decided by his team in Seattle he would need a bone marrow transplant. Kyler had to get a unrelated donor because his little sister Nevaeh was not a match. October 17th 2014 is when Kyler received his donor cells and is 100% his donor!!!

We will be heading to Seattle Oct 16th for Kyler's 2 year post bone marrow transplant check! He has had monthly labs and is also finishing up on his immunizations since the transplant wiped out all of his prior. Kyler is in the 1st grade and enjoying every day! 

Lauren

Angel Lauren Sophia Maziarz Lauren Sophia Maziarz was diagnosed with cancer in May of 2009. She endured 7…

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Lauren

Angel

Lauren Sophia Maziarz Lauren Sophia Maziarz was diagnosed with cancer in May of 2009. She endured 7 rounds of chemotherapy, 6 major surgeries, 20 rounds of radiation which she endured alone in the radiation vault and hundreds of shots, bone marrow biopsies, scans, blood transfusions and other painful procedures. In spite of it all, she rarely whined and kept a heart full of optimism and hope. Lauren was a bright child, putting two words together at 12 months, and after mastering English began learning Mandarin. Lauren wanted to grow up to be a doctor like her parents, and she wanted to cure cancer. In her honor, numerous fundraisers were held for Cookies for Kids Cancer and Alex's Lemonade Stand. Lauren knew children's cancers are not given as much money as adult cancers, and she thought this was wrong and wanted to change it. Lauren was beautiful, effervescent, and a true bon vivant. Lauren suffered a horrific and preventable brain injury at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City on May 16, 2010. She came home on hospice with her family on July 5. Lauren was paralyzed and unable to walk or talk. Through her final and painful five months on earth she continued to teach others about grace and effort. Until her very last day on this earth, she did her very best. Lauren lived more, accomplished more, loved more and fought harder to live in her five years than most adults will in a fair lifetime.

Liam

Angel Monday, February 26th, 2007, started out as a day just like any other day. It wound up…

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Liam

Angel

Monday, February 26th, 2007, started out as a day just like any other day. It wound up being the day my life, my husband’s life, my daughter’s life and the life of everyone who loved us and our precious son Liam would be forever changed.

Our appointment was to discuss some nebulous symptoms that alone were nothing but grouped together amounted, in my “mommy mind”, to something.  Our trusted pediatrician examined Liam then asked me to meet him in his office. I felt a sense of relief that he was taking my concerns seriously.  Multiple tests were ordered.  Once these tests were completed, he told me the ultrasound found a large mass in my son’s abdomen.


I wanted to collapse but I couldn’t because I was with Liam. I wanted to cry but I couldn’t because I was in too much shock. I wanted to throw up but I couldn’t because I hadn’t eaten all day. I wanted to take back those words. I wanted my mommy instincts to be wrong. I wanted to reverse the hands of time but I knew that was impossible.

That night a very scared little boy was strapped down to a table to insert a needle in his arm to run fluids in him. The next day after a CT scan, I was told my 33-month-old son had stage IV cancer and needed an immediate operation. By that night we were transported by ambulance to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and started the odyssey of reclaiming our sweet son from the cancer cells that were trying to overtake his body.

On this odyssey, we have learned that pediatric cancer robs families of more children than any other disease. We learned about the vast disparity between funding for pediatric cancer and other cancers. We learned of the lack of interest on the part of pharmaceutical companies to invest research and development dollars in treatments and cures. And after we learned all of these shocking facts, we decided to do something about it.

Together we can make a difference. Together we can improve children’s odds, children like my son who I love more than anything.

Lucy

In March of 2009, our world was turned upside down when our daughter, Lucy Rose, was diagnosed with…

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Lucy

In March of 2009, our world was turned upside down when our daughter, Lucy Rose, was diagnosed with High Risk Neuroblastoma at age 3. Her tumor was found during a routine well-child check. Since then, she has endured 2 surgeries, 6 cycles of chemotherapy, 14 rounds of radiation, 6 months of cis-retinoic acid, 14 cycles of 3f8 antibody and multiple blood transfusions, hospitalizations and medical tests.

Today, Lucy is 10 years old and enjoying life as a fourth grader. She has been NED (no evidence of disease) since her tumor was removed, and we hope and pray that she remains NED for the rest of her life. Research is why Lucy is alive and well today, but more research is needed. We need research for those children whose cancer is not responding to the treatment that is out there, in honor of all those beautiful children who earned their angel wings because treatments were not enough and for all the children who have fought and are still in the fight. 

www.lucyslight.org

Maja

January 2, 2009 Maja was admitted to the children's department here in Bodø because doctors found a tumor…

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Maja

January 2, 2009 Maja was admitted to the children's department here in Bodø because doctors found a tumor of 11 x 13 cm in her belly, January 4, she was transferred to the University of  Tromsø. The reason that Maja was examined by a doctor that Friday was since mid December she had been plagued with cramps in the stomach, often in conjunction with meals. Therefore, we thought it could be a food allergy that gave abdominal pain and wanted to get this checked out. But the result of the doctor visit was completely different than we had imagined. During a day at the children's department was our life turned upside down.

We've got the final diagnosis January 16, 2009 and it is a form of cancer called Neuroblastoma.

In June 2010 we confirmed a relapse of Neuroblastoma with Maja, this time the tumor is in the brain. A type of recurrence that there is no treatment for in Norway and that no one in this country has survived at present. After intense exploration a hospital (Sloan Kettering) was found in New York who had a protocol to treat neuroblastoma on the brain, with very good results. Maja was operated on, received radiation and chemo based on this prototype unit, because doctors in Tromsø has one goal Maja.  So after much care, much paperwork and planning, we were finally able to make trip.

Maja is currently battling her third relapse.  

http://maja-blogg.no/

Matt

Matt was an amazing and passionate young man who forever changed the lives of all he met. He…

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Matt

Matt was an amazing and passionate young man who forever changed the lives of all he met. He loved to cook, wrestle, fish, God and was very artistic. He diagnosed with Osteosarcoma (bone cancer) two weeks before his high school graduation. He immediately started a rigorous inpatient chemotherapy followed by surgery removing most of his femur and knee. It was replaced with a prosthetic titanium knee and rod. He was determined to beat his cancer and after only a few months of therapy and a lot of determination he amazed his medical team and was able to walk with only a slight limp, not noticeable to those who didn’t know he wore a prosthesis.

For the next seven years, Matt attempted to move forward in life every chance he had, like starting architect school at MSU, however he repeatedly had to put life on hold as he battled his cancer. He spent much of those seven years in hospitals receiving chemotherapy, radiation, and multiple lung surgeries. Upon news of a relapse in 2008, Matt and his sister came up with an idea to help find a cure for childhood cancer and because Matt’s love was fishing, “Fishin’ for the Cure”, was born. While undergoing treatment, Matt helped Fishin’ for the Cure’s first tournament in 2008, and his legacy is continued on through it today in Montana, Arizona and North Dakota.

Matt never gave up and was willing to try anything, unfortunately Christmas of 2009 he was told he had no more options. He kept going though; even trying a drug not approved by the FDA for human use but that had shown great results in dogs with osteosarcoma.

At our 3rd annual Fishin’ for the Cure, 2010, although very sick, Matt was somehow able to get in the boat and fish. He caught the catch of his life and the winning walleye measuring 31 ½ inches. It was the catch of his life, and just a few weeks later Matt became cancer free when he earned his angel wings.

He fought the good fight, he finished the race, and kept the faith.  Timothy 4:7

We promised Matt we would keep Fishin’ for the Cure going to find a cure and prevent other children from the battle Matt had to fight. Find out more at http://www.fishinforthecure.com/

Morgan

Morgan is a sweet girl from Plant City, FL.   She has been fighting stage 4 Neuroblastoma for nearly…

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Morgan

Morgan is a sweet girl from Plant City, FL.   She has been fighting stage 4 Neuroblastoma for nearly 9 years. She has relapsed 7 times, undergone 38 rounds of chemo, more than 70 rounds of radiation, 39 rounds of painful antibody treatments along with various other treatments to try and rid her body of cancer. Morgan is currently undergoing chemo and fighting. She helped fundraise at the age of 6 for a trial Cookies For Kids Cancer helped to fund and that she went onto receive called hu3f8. She has also participated in and inspired other bake sales, pageants and the annual Good Cookie 5K Plant City Florida event that took place this past weekend. She is a true advocate for childhood cancer research and speaks of the need for better, less toxic and less painful treatments so that other kids won't have to endure what she has for more than half of her young life.

http://www.sparklyflower.wordpress.com/

Morgan

Morgan was 12 when he was diagnosed with cancer. He had been very pale and low on energy…

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Morgan

Morgan was 12 when he was diagnosed with cancer. He had been very pale and low on energy for several months, so we took him to the doctor. We expected that he might have anemia and would need a shot or iron pills. A quick blood test showed he actually had leukemia (ALL). A day later and 700 miles from home, he was admitted to The Children's Hospital in Aurora, CO. Within a few weeks he was in remission, and he began a 3-year outpatient treatment plan through a hospital close to home. A year later, due to his suppressed immune system, he came down with a serious blood infection and was life-flighted to Denver. After several tough weeks, he recovered and resumed treatment in Bozeman -- a monthly spinal tap and chemotherapy. He was adjusting as well as possible, but we were stunned when a routine blood test in March 2010 indicated that he had relapsed. He would again need life-saving treatment in Denver, which would include heavy doses of chemotherapy for two months, followed by total body irradiation and a bone marrow transplant. The good news was that his father turned out to be a match for the bone marrow transplant. The recovery process after transplant was not easy, but after four months he was allowed to return home. Morgan is six years post-transplant and still in remission. He’s a sophomore in college majoring in computer science, and volunteering during the summer at Eagle Mount’s camps for kids fighting cancer. They all have the same scars so there is a strong bond between these tough survivors.

Nadine

Angel Nadine Grace Beadle Long was an amazing young woman with a brilliant smile who loved her friends…

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Nadine

Angel

Nadine Grace Beadle Long was an amazing young woman with a brilliant smile who loved her friends and family fiercely and lived life with gusto.  A native Montanan, she was born in Great Falls and lived in Marysville, just north of Helena, with her loving parents and brother, Levi.  She spent many summers at Eagle Mount’s Big Sky Kids and Camp Mak-A-Dream, with that new family that came into her life because of her Wilms tumor diagnosis.  Nadine was first diagnosed at age 6 with stage II Wilms while on a family vacation in New Hampshire.  She was treated at Children’s Hospital at Dartmouth and then returned to St. Peter’s in Helena for the rest of her first bout of cancer, and later for two relapses.  The first came at age 7, almost a year to the day from her initial diagnosis.  The second aggressive relapse was diagnosed in March 2015 only a few short days before Nadine passed away, surrounded by her family and dear friends.  She had just turned 16.  Nadine loved the water, adventure, and practically anything outdoors.  Snowboarding, kayaking, swimming, fishing, geocaching, hiking, camping, and reading were some of her favorite activities.  She gravitated towards those around her, including Lucy’s Light namesake, Lucy, and her sister Lily, both of whom she utterly adored the summer she met them at camp.  Nadine had a mature and wise faith and understanding of what is truly important in life.  She spread this wisdom to many with the words, “Having cancer is no fun – but that doesn’t mean that you can’t have fun just because you have cancer.”  She lived those words, even in her final days, when she asked for those in attendance at her funeral to wear bright colors, saying, “Yes, it’s sad.  But it’s joyful.”  As you read this story, please take a moment to celebrate all of the joy and wonders in life.  In doing so, you’ll be paying a beautiful tribute to Nadine, too.   

Nathen

​Nathen Trueblood Forever 7 After a 5 1/2 year battle with Stage 4 Neuroblastoma Nathen was forever cured February…

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Nathen

​Nathen Trueblood Forever 7 After a 5 1/2 year battle with Stage 4 Neuroblastoma Nathen was forever cured February 1st, 2013. Nathen was diagnosed just before his 2nd birthday and courageously fought thru countless rounds of chemo, radiation, brain surgeries, transfusions, 3 stem cell transplants, etc. He traveled from NYC to California in search of a cure. At age 7 Nathen flew to heaven and joined all his friends who left this world much too soon. You can read more about Nathen's life on his FB page Prayers4Nathen.

Noah

Our world turned upside down on December 18, 2007. Noah (6) was having sporadic side pain so we…

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Noah

Our world turned upside down on December 18, 2007. Noah (6) was having sporadic side pain so we took him to the pediatrician and they said he had intestinal flu and if the pain continues bring him back, well the pain continued and he was then diagnosed with intussusception. He underwent a barium enema only to find a 4" tumor sitting above his right kidney. This tumor turned out to be Neuroblastoma cancer, which sprouted out of the right adrenal gland.

He underwent four rounds of low-dose chemo and had the tumor removed on April 7, 2008. It wasn't 100% removed and our home Oncologist reassured us that with Noah's histology and biology it wouldn't come back.

Noah had a recurrence on October 5, 2008.  He had 3 high-dose rounds of chemo, radiation & surgery. Noah was NED (no evidence of disease) for 15 months and then relapsed in April of 2010. He endured 3 rounds of chemo along with radiation and after scans in June 2010 he started 3f8 Monoclonal Antibodies treatment.  He remains NED!  

SuperNoah2007

Quinn

Angel Quinn Jolie Shomer (Feb. 20, 2010 - July 15,2011) Quinn was the love of our lives. A…

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Quinn

Angel

Quinn Jolie Shomer (Feb. 20, 2010 - July 15,2011) Quinn was the love of our lives. A bright light in our world which was extinguished by the monster we came to know as Neuroblastoma. Quinn bravely battled this beast for 6 months, and smiled every day while doing it. We always thought she would be one of the lucky survivors because she was always so happy, so strong. When Quinn took her last breath, a part of us died with her, no parent should ever have to lose their child to Cancer. Our hope is that a cure for this horrible disease is found within our lifetime, and supporting charities and organizations that contribute to this goal will always be part of our lives. We love you dearly little Quinn, and miss you every day. Our little angel. ​

Ryan

Ryan was diagnosed with Stave IV neuroblastoma in 2004 at the age of 4 ½.   Our sweet blond-haired…

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Ryan

Ryan was diagnosed with Stave IV neuroblastoma in 2004 at the age of 4 ½.   Our sweet blond-haired pre-schooler thus began what would be a long, 7 ½ year journey of grueling treatment including countless rounds of chemotherapy and radiation, several surgeries, immunotherapy, and diagnostic tests of every kind.   In that time, he relapsed three times and was never off-treatment.  Ever.  Yet, Ryan faced these challenges with such an indomitable spirit and boundless courage that he earned the title “The Amazing Super Ryan”.  Ryan loved baseball, becoming a rabid Red Sox fan and playing Little League whenever he could.  He also loved to read and devoured the whole Harry Potter series, becoming the most knowledgeable HP aficionado this side of Hogwarts.  Ryan also loved music, family gatherings and hanging out with his friends.  Neuroblastoma took our sweet boy from us in September of 2011 at the age of 12.  His light and legacy live on in all who were privileged enough to have known The Amazing Super Ryan.    

Samuel

At 5 years of age, Samuel was diagnosed with Medulloblastoma in July 2012. A 3.5 cm tumor was…

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Samuel

At 5 years of age, Samuel was diagnosed with Medulloblastoma in July 2012. A 3.5 cm tumor was removed from his cerebellum. This was followed by 30 rounds of radiation therapy with weekly chemo, and 9 rounds of maintenance chemotherapy.  

Today, Sam is 10 years old and a sweet natured kid with a silly side. He loves playing jokes on his family and has an infectious laugh. He is cancer free and thriving. He loves Lego's, playing games, watching movies, and spending time with his family. He wants to be an engineer and work with robots when he grows up.

Sarah

This is my daughter, Sarah.  She was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma (cancer in both eyes) on March 19,…

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Sarah

This is my daughter, Sarah.  She was diagnosed with bilateral retinoblastoma (cancer in both eyes) on March 19, 2009 when she was only 8 months old. She lost her left eye on February 28th 2011 and has been cancer free in her right eye for over 2 years now. This little girl continues to amaze me with her courage & strength. Retinoblastoma affects children under 2 years old with about 350 new cases being diagnosed in the United States each year. It can sometimes be detected in a photograph with a "white" glare in the eye. It can also look glassy like a cat's eye in dim light. Sarah receives her treatment at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. Sarah is NED!!!!!!! 

Sarah

Angel Fly high sweet girl. Sarah earned her angel wings on October 1st, 2016. Sarah was diagnosed with…

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Sarah

Angel

Fly high sweet girl. Sarah earned her angel wings on October 1st, 2016.

Sarah was diagnosed with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) on October 18, 2011 at the age of 11 years old. Sarah and her family lived in Montana, but they had to travel to Primary Children’s Medical Center (PCMC) in Utah for treatment. She had a port placed and started her first chemotherapy treatment on October 20. She had a bone marrow biopsy after her first round of chemo on December 6. It showed that she was in complete remission and she would have to have 3 more rounds of chemo and no bone marrow transplant. She finished her 4 rounds of chemo on April 24, 2016 after 6 months of fighting cancer. She got to ring the bell on June 2, 2012 and got to go home after spending over 100 days in the hospital.

She continued to have blood draws and bone marrow biopsies to make sure she was still in remission. Right before Thanksgiving in 2012, Sarah had blood work done that showed that her counts were low so they traveled to Utah to have a bone marrow biopsy to rule out relapse. In December, Sarah traveled to Utah and had her bone marrow biopsy. The biopsy showed that Sarah either relapsed or had MDS (Myelodysplastic Syndrome), a disorder that affects the bone marrow’s ability to make blood cells. Both would require a bone marrow transplant (BMT).

Sarah headed back up to Utah and they found out that she had relapsed with AML. She soon started preparing for a bone marrow transplant. After intense chemotherapy, Sarah had a bone marrow transplant on March 9, 2013 donated from a complete stranger on the bone marrow registry. On April 3 (day 25+), Sarah engrafted, meaning that her body accepted the transplant and was making her own blood cells. On April 22 Sarah got to ring the bell again, but she still couldn’t go home to Montana until day 100+. She continued to take 18 pills every morning and 18 at night, making a total of 36 pills a day. Her 100 day post-transplant tests showed that she was 100% donor and still in remission. They found out that Sarah’s blood type was changing from hers to her donor’s so it was causing her body to make antibodies that destroyed her red blood cells. She had to be placed on steroids.

Sarah would continue to have blood work and bone marrow aspirates frequently to make sure she was still in remission. At one of her appointments, her blood sugar was high because of the steroids and she was diagnosed with diabetes. To add to her many pills and doctor’s appointments, Sarah would have to check her numbers 4 times a day and take insulin once a week. In November 2012, she was able to start weaning off of the steroids. Once she was weaned off the steroids she no longer had to test her blood sugar and give insulin.

In January 2014, Sarah had had an upset stomach for a while and they decided to take biopsies of her colon and stomach to see if it was caused by Graft-Vs-Host Disease (GVHD) or CMV (a virus). They showed that Sarah had a very mild case of GVHD and no CMV, but she wasn’t given more steroids because it was so mild and she had already had so much and they had just weaned her off.

In June 2016, Sarah’s family found out that she had relapsed and this time they would be going to Seattle for another transplant. Sarah’s kidneys were found to be damaged because of the anti-rejection medication she was on to prevent/help GVHD from her first transplant. On August 23, 2016, Sarah had her second bone marrow transplant at the age of 15. She had to start dialysis on August 31 because her kidneys were not working. Sarah engrafted on September 22 (day +30) and her bone marrow biopsy showed that she was 100% donor.

In the past week, Sarah had a small bruise on her nose that had gotten worse. Her doctors were worried that it was a fungal infection. After an MRI and CT scan, a very large, very aggressive fungal infection was found in her nasal cavity, eye, brain, and on the roof of her mouth. It is close to impossible to treat and would require very invasive surgery. She has been placed on every anti-fungal medication she can be on. Unfortunately Sarah did not survive the infection.

CaringBridge Site: http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/sarahmageraShe continued to have blood draws and bone marrow biopsies to make sure she was still in remission. Right before Thanksgiving in 2012, Sarah had blood work done that showed that her counts were low so they traveled to Utah to have a bone marrow biopsy to rule out relapse. In December, Sarah traveled to Utah and had her bone marrow biopsy. The biopsy showed that Sarah either relapsed or had MDS (Myelodysplastic Syndrome), a disorder that affects the bone marrow’s ability to make blood cells. Both would require a bone marrow transplant (BMT).

Sarah headed back up to Utah and they found out that she had relapsed with AML. She soon started preparing for a bone marrow transplant. After intense chemotherapy, Sarah had a bone marrow transplant on March 9, 2013 donated from a complete stranger on the bone marrow registry. On April 3 (day 25+), Sarah engrafted, meaning that her body accepted the transplant and was making her own blood cells. On April 22 Sarah got to ring the bell again, but she still couldn’t go home to Montana until day 100+. She continued to take 18 pills every morning and 18 at night, making a total of 36 pills a day. Her 100 day post-transplant tests showed that she was 100% donor and still in remission. They found out that Sarah’s blood type was changing from hers to her donor’s so it was causing her body to make antibodies that destroyed her red blood cells. She had to be placed on steroids.

Sarah would continue to have blood work and bone marrow aspirates frequently to make sure she was still in remission. At one of her appointments, her blood sugar was high because of the steroids and she was diagnosed with diabetes. To add to her many pills and doctor’s appointments, Sarah would have to check her numbers 4 times a day and take insulin once a week. In November 2012, she was able to start weaning off of the steroids. Once she was weaned off the steroids she no longer had to test her blood sugar and give insulin.

In January 2014, Sarah had had an upset stomach for a while and they decided to take biopsies of her colon and stomach to see if it was caused by Graft-Vs-Host Disease (GVHD) or CMV (a virus). They showed that Sarah had a very mild case of GVHD and no CMV, but she wasn’t given more steroids because it was so mild and she had already had so much and they had just weaned her off.

In June 2016, Sarah’s family found out that she had relapsed and this time they would be going to Seattle for another transplant. Sarah’s kidneys were found to be damaged because of the anti-rejection medication she was on to prevent/help GVHD from her first transplant. On August 23, 2016, Sarah had her second bone marrow transplant at the age of 15. She had to start dialysis on August 31 because her kidneys were not working. Sarah engrafted on September 22 (day +30) and her bone marrow biopsy showed that she was 100% donor.

Sarah had a small bruise on her nose that had gotten worse. Her doctors were worried that it was a fungal infection. After an MRI and CT scan, a very large, very aggressive fungal infection was found in her nasal cavity, eye, brain, and on the roof of her mouth. It is close to impossible to treat and would require very invasive surgery. She has been placed on every anti-fungal medication she can be on. The chance of her making it through this infection without removing part of her brain, eye, and nose it not likely so her family is on their way to Seattle to say good-bye.

CaringBridge Site: http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/sarahmagera

Stellablue

Stella is a 9-year-old 4th grader and a childhood kidney cancer survivor. At 4 years of age, she…

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Stellablue

Stella is a 9-year-old 4th grader and a childhood kidney cancer survivor. At 4 years of age, she was diagnosed with stage IV, diffuse anaplastic Wilms tumor that had spread to her lungs. Upon diagnosis, her family (which included a brand new baby sister) was forced to move from their home in Bozeman, MT to Seattle Children’s Hospital for 1 and ½ years of treatment. Her prognosis was very poor, yet despite struggling with advanced, aggressive disease and relapse, she is thriving today and almost 4 years cancer free.

Like many children with cancer, Stella has been through more medical procedures than most people face in a lifetime. She has been near to death too many times to recall, yet she has always persevered and fought her way through some very difficult battles, including several very intense surgeries (her initial tumor resection was 14 hours long and removed a cantaloupe-sized tumor), a stem cell transplant, and massive doses of chemotherapy and radiation. In her own words, Stella says, “I do not believe in failure”.

Childhood cancer was a life-changing and eye-opening experience for Stella and her family. Thankfully, childhood cancer is extremely rare, and most people do not have to go through it. This rarity is part of a larger problem however, namely that very little funding or awareness exists for childhood cancer, resulting in a lack of research, and treatments that oftentimes fail patients. Loosing many of her close friends in the childhood cancer-world has been very difficult.

Today, Stella is an active and happy 9-year-old. She goes to school at LaMotte Elementary in Bozeman, and enjoys learning and playing with her friends. She has recently learned to ride a bike all on her own (a source of great pride), and she finished the Harry Potter series this past summer. In the winter months, she loves skiing with her family. She will most-likely suffer from treatment-related side-effects for the rest of her life, yet she faces these all with a smile on her face and an unwavering good spirit. She is the source of inspiration for many.

The Bozeman 3 on Facebook

www.caringbridge.org/visit/stellabluewoods

Ty

Ty was diagnosed with stage 4 Neuroblastoma in 2008 when he was only 16 months old. He endured…

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Ty

Ty was diagnosed with stage 4 Neuroblastoma in 2008 when he was only 16 months old. He endured harsh toxic treatment (high does chemo, surgeries, stem cell/bone marrow transplant , radiation, and a painful antibody treatment which we flew coast to coast to New York for 2 years to receive). Ty has been "No Evidence of Disease" ( NED) since 2010. 

While we are extremely thankful and blessed that Ty is still here, he is now suffering from the late effects of cancer. Ironically, the treatment used to save my son's life, is now the cause of many issues. He has high frequency hearing loss, missing 8 adult teeth which were never formed and due to all the radiation done to his left tibia, his leg began to grow inwards and very slow. Due to the unevenness of his legs, he began to experience back pain and tire easily. As a result, Ty had a very invasive and painful surgery in 2015, where we had to lengthen his left leg and an “external fixator” ( picture 6 large metal pins going inside his leg with 3 halo rings below his knee). He wore this external fixator for one year. 

For Ty's entire 3rd grade year ( last year), he was not able to participate in recess or have lunch with his friends at the lunchtime. He could not run or play the sports he loved. He spent the entire summer in New York, involved in physical therapy and relearning to walk again. He was in so much pain and was often stared at due to having the bulky fixator on his leg. 

Ty's external fixator was removed this past June. He walks with a limp, as he is re-learning to use his leg. He has frequent pain in his foot and is involved in physical therapy weekly. He still can't run and is self-conscious of his leg, as it has many scars and it's not completely straight. 

My son is surviving cancer.. it’s not as pretty as people think it should be.. it’s actually pretty crappy for a young boy who just wants to be " a normal kid". We will always be worried about relapse and secondary cancers. But we are also grateful for the opportunity to raise awareness and funds for pediatric cancer. We don't want any other child to suffer like Ty, so we fight for all cancer kids. 

Tyson

This is Tyson's story of his diagnosis of T cell Lymphoma. Symptoms began on April 16, 2011. We…

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Tyson

This is Tyson's story of his diagnosis of T cell Lymphoma. Symptoms began on April 16, 2011. We had spent the day in Billings at an indoor water park. During the drive home Tyson started complaining about pain in his left shoulder.  After seeing a chiropractor and massage therapist we went to the pediatrician’s office. Range of motion tests showed he had pulled muscles in his shoulder.

The next week continued much the same. His complaints came more often and we noticed changes in his symptoms. His appetite decreased, his skin was ashen and clammy, his activity level decreased, and he was extremely irritable. At this point Tyson was spiking fevers often. It was time for a second opinion because something just wasn't right.  On May 3, 2011, Tyson was back at the pediatrician’s office.  After his CT scan, two doctors came in, Tyson's pediatrician and the on-call doctor, each pulling up chairs across from us. Our doctor tells us "Tyson has cancer".  I don't remember much of what was said after that.  We were told he needed immediate care and they were working on getting Life Flight arranged for his transport. We chose Denver Children's Hospital.

This journey with a disease called cancer is not an easy one. There was a time when Tyson was ready to give up the fight because he had nothing left to give. Multiple blood transfusions, long trips to Denver or Billings for weekly visits to the hospital for chemotherapy, countless pokes for blood draws and chemotherapy, nausea and vomiting, lethargy, hair loss, constantly being cold, wondering if this week your blood count was so low that you couldn't be around people other than you immediate family members, left him wondering why me? Then things get progressively better and life isn't so hard after all. In fact, it becomes quite simple: Food, Friends and Family, Home, and the Great Outdoors.  

Tyson has been off therapy since September, 2013.  Having completed chemotherapy a year ahead of schedule because of changes to chemotherapy protocol.  Although there were some initial setbacks he is back on track and living the life of others children his age.  The only difference is he is much more mature than his peers because of his experience "Kicking Cancer". 

Thanks to the prayers and support of family, friends and community we have survived what we didn't think we could. Our lives are forever changed because of his diagnosis. No child or person should have to deal with such a cruel and ugly disease. Though cancer research has come a long way in the past 10 years there is still no cure. If you would like to read more about Tyson's journey please visit: www.caringbridge.org/visit/tysonreardon

Walker

On Thursday August 27, 2015 our 6-year old son Walker Wagner was taken to our pediatrician for what…

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Walker

On Thursday August 27, 2015 our 6-year old son Walker Wagner was taken to our pediatrician for what we thought would be his annual exam. Instead we walked out devastated and in shock with the diagnosis of a brain tumor. That night we were life flighted from Bozeman, MT to Children’s Hospital in Denver, Colorado. On August 31, the tumor was removed but weeks later we got our second worst nightmare that he did in fact have a malignant medulloblastoma.

The tumor removal although it was successful has left us with some hard side effects. First, suffering from a mild case of Posterior Fossa Syndrome in which he was mute and very agitated. For weeks he wore a patch for double vision, the left side weak making it difficult for Walker to walk and use his left arm. A year’s worth of therapies and time he is walking, talking and sometimes even running again! Walker endured 31 rounds of radiation to his brain and spine.  September 15, 2016 is his expected last round of chemotherapy.

No parent can ever prepare for the horrible diagnosis that your child has cancer. The fact that it will cripple you emotionally, tear your family into two states, rob your finances, leave your heart aching for good health and unable to breath with the thought that your child could be taken from you too soon. Our eyes will forever be open to finding a cure for our son and for all the other beautiful children diagnosed with cancer. We join other cancer families in the fight for funding, finding cures and try to unlock the closed doors to those around us unaware of how these children and those who love them suffer. 

Our Journey can be followed at http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/walkerwagner or on facebook